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The perfect baby name, history behind names, the random name generator, and much more in the Internet Names Database. INDb contains a whole catalog of names and surnames, with descriptions, history and curiosities about every name.



EA m : Meaning unknown, perhaps from Sumerian meaning "house of water". This was the Akkadian and Babylonian name of the Sumerian water god Enki.

EA (1) m : Meaning unknown, perhaps from Sumerian meaning "house of water". This was the Akkadian and Babylonian name of the Sumerian water god Enki.

EA (2) f : Short form of names ending in ea.

EACHANN m : Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.

EADAN f : Modern form of ÉTAÍN.

EADBERHT m : Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kin...

EADBHÁRD m : Irish form of EDWARD.

EADBURG f : Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".

EADBURGA f : Variant of EADBURG.

EADGAR m : Old English form of EDGAR.

EADGYÐ f : Old English form of EDITH.

EADMUND m : Old English form of EDMUND.

EADRIC m : Old English form of EDRIC.

EADWEARD m : Old English form of EDWARD.

EADWIG m : Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name ...

EADWINE m : Old English form of EDWIN.

EADWULF m : Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.

EALAIR m : Scottish Gaelic form of HILARY.

EALASAID f : Scottish Gaelic form of ELIZABETH.

EALDGYÐ f : Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".

EALDRÆD m : From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.

EALDWINE m : From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.

EALHHERE m : Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".

EALHSTAN m : Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".

EALISAID f : Manx form of ELIZABETH.

EAMON m : Variant of ÉAMONN.

EAN m : Manx form of JOHN.

EANRAIG m : Scottish Gaelic form of HENRY.

EARDWULF m : Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".

EARL m : From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.



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